Calcarea carbonica derivative complex (M8) as adjuvant treatment of inflammatory mammary carcinoma in a dog

Authors

  • Daniella Matos da Silva Departament of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Paraná
  • Eneida Janiscki Da Lozzo
  • Carolina Camargo de Oliveira Departament of Cell Biology, Federal University of Paraná
  • Dorly de Freitas Buchi Departament of Cell Biology, Federal University of Paraná
  • Simone Domit Guérios Departament of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Paraná

Keywords:

Calcarea carbonica complex, inflammatory mammary carcinoma, pyroxican

Abstract

Background: Inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC) is locally aggressive, fast growing, highly malignant tumor that affects humans and dogs. Affected dogs usually are presented with generalized edema, pain, erythema, and skin ulceration in mammary glands. Surgery is not recommended and an effective treatment has not been established [1]. Calcarea carbonica derivative complex (M8) has demonstrated anticancer properties in a murine model, by improving innate immune response against tumor cells [2,3]. M8 is a complex high diluted medication comprised of a 10%-20% concentration of Calcarea carbonica, Aconitum napellus, Arsenicum album, Asa foetida, Conium maculatum, Ipecacuanha, Phosphorus, Rhus tox, Silicea, Sulphur, and Thuya occidentalis, all in decimal dilutions of Hahnemann in distilled water and submitted to vigorous shaking. Aim: Describe an association of M8 and piroxicam (Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) to treat a dog with IMC. Discussion: A 7 years old, mixed breed intact female dog was presented to the Federal University of Parana - Veterinary Hospital, Curitiba (HV-UFPR) for mammary glands examination. The owners related inflammation of mammary glands with clinical course of approximately 10 days, which was treated for mastitis (cephalexin and metergoline) without clinical improvement. Clinical examination revealed erythema, increased skin warmth, pain on palpation, and plaque involving the 4th and 5th right mammary glands. Abdominal ultrasound and serum biochemistry were unremarkable. Thoracic radiographs showed suspicious images of pulmonary metastasis. Fine needle biopsy was taken for cytologic examination. Cytological interpretation was a malignant epithelial neoplasm, probably a mammary carcinoma. Diagnosis of IMC was based on clinical signs and cytopathology. Dog was treated with oral (0.5 mL) and topical M8 twice a day for 15 days, and pyroxican, 0.3mg/kg, PO, q24h. Clinical improvement was observed 7 days after starting treatment. Until present date (70 treatment days with M8), dog has no clinical signs of IMC, and does not show signs of disease progression. Conclusion: The present report suggests that M8 associated with piroxicam contributes to improvement of IMC dog’s quality of life and survival rate. However, further clinical studies are needed to evaluate response to treatment in patients diagnosed with IMC.

Author Biographies

Daniella Matos da Silva, Departament of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Paraná

Eneida Janiscki Da Lozzo

Carolina Camargo de Oliveira, Departament of Cell Biology, Federal University of Paraná

Dorly de Freitas Buchi, Departament of Cell Biology, Federal University of Paraná

Simone Domit Guérios, Departament of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Paraná

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Published

2011-08-17

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